Charles Seligman Art

About

     Charles Seligman can still remember when he first was attracted to expressing himself through art. It was 1939 and he was five years old, discovering the joys of finger painting
in the basement of the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston (MFA). Today - Charles is still putting his feelings on canvas, for his own enjoyment as well as that of his many patrons. Charles art career has survived more than a few detours along the way. His exposure to art classes came to a halt when the family moved from Houston to Baytown in 1948. After graduating from that city's Robert E. Lee High School, he went on to Southern Methodist University in Dallas where he studied business administration for five years. Shortly thereafter, Charles was drafted by the army and served in Bremerhaven, Germany for 18 months. It was during that time on a trip from Bremerhaven to Olso, Norway with a friend, that Charles' interest in art was reawakened. "I believe we visited every museum along the way," remembers Charles. "My eyes were opened - it was like seeing and studying art for the first time." Instead of entering the art world, however, after his discharge in 1961 he returned to Baytown to work in the family's successful automobile dealership. He advanced from sales into management with the goal of an early retirement. At the age of 40, Charles got his wish - the day he and his mother sold the controlling interest in the dealership, he enrolled in the MFA's Glassell School of art.
     The year was 1975, and Charles immersed himself in classes offered by Glassell. Distinguishing himself as a star pupil who could fill the canvas with life, his instructors came to him three years later and said, "Charlie, go home and paint - we have nothing else to teach you." HIs second career had begun. Taking his former instructors' directive to heart, Charles has since devoted his efforts full-time to artistic expression using combinations of mediums - canvas, paper and mixed media projects. Large scale canvasses however, are where the scope of his creativity is most evident. Here, with the generous use of paint, he works with a combination of palette knives, brushes and even his fingers when the spirit moves him. The results are powerful abstract images. He has developed a following of patrons and has sold his art from his studio for over the last 28 years. His works can be found in the homes and businesses of discriminating collectors worldwide, who appreciate his abstract works of art for the energy and emotion they portray.